Archive for the tag 'ADR Institutions'

Three Upcoming ADR Conferences

The next few weeks are more than usually packed with high-quality convenings.  The World Mediation Forum will meet in Houston on March 21-22; the ABA Dispute Resolution Section will meet in Miami April 2-5; and the Business Law Section of the ABA (and its Dispute Resolution Committee) will hold its Spring Meeting in Los Angeles April 10-12. Read more »

Multidoor Courthouse on a Global Scale

A young, vibrant and alive mentor once taught me that it costs no more to dream big than to dream little.  And Michael Leathes is dreaming big.

With IMI Chair Deborah Masucci, Michael has recently proposed a “Global Pound Conference.”  Referring to the 1976 conference at which Prof. Frank Sander shared his vision of a “multidoor courthouse,” Masucci and Leathes are calling for an event to “shake ADR out of its slumber” and “kick-start” mediation on a global scale.

 

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ABA Dispute Resolution Section Spring Meeting Announced

I have been importuned by the ABA Dispute Resolution Section to remind readers of its upcoming Spring Meeting in Miami,Florida on April 2-5, 2014.  And who better to be importuned by?  It is a great organization and the Spring Meeting has been “the place to see and be seen” since it started in 1999.  The announcement follows. Read more »

IBA Guidelines on Party Representation in International Arbitration

The International Bar Association has been responsible for several definitive guidelines to assist practitioners in international arbitration.  These include the 2010 Guide for Drafting International Arbitration Agreements, the 2010 Rules for Taking of Evidence, and the 2004 Guide on Conflicts of Interest.  To this we now add  the IBA Guidelines on Party Representation in International Arbitration, adopted by the IBA Council on May 25, 2013.

Arbitration Committee Co-Chairs Alexis Mourre and Eduardo Zuleta explain these Guidelines in the November 2013 issue of Dispute Resolution International.  They explain that, as Guidelines, they are contractual in nature and apply only when the parties have agreed and where the arbitrators wish to rely upon then (having determined that they have the authority to rule on matters of party representation). Read more »

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